Rewrite of Critical Reflection 1

Rewritten Critical Reflection: 

Why do I need to become a reflective practitioner? 

During each day every individual will reflect on past, present or future issues they have or will be presented with in both personal and professional situations. Reflection isn’t just thinking about something in particular it is a process of identifying issues, questioning opinions, synthesising information and applying learning (Australian Catholic University, 2016).

To become a reflective practitioner, the process of self awareness, critical analysis, synthesis and evaluation allow each individual to be honest with oneself, question underlying values and beliefs and explore strengths and weaknesses (ACU, 2016). Reflection is used in all areas whether it be in everyday life, in your academic career or your future profession.

An example of an active reflective practitioner is the production of a personal blog whether it be educational, home and lifestyles or art and entertainment. Creating a blog for the public allows for connected learning as part of a community, sharing strengths and weakness, interests and hobbies and personal reflection. With the acceptance of public commentary and posts, individuals are able to learn from others, gain more information from a wide range of materials and connect with like minded people throughout the blogging community.

Reflective practices are also required in the business world, an example being education where teachers are able to continually improve and work on teaching methods and activities used in the classroom. It is here where teachers in similar fields are able to document their research, findings and opinions on specific activities performed by students such as worksheets or learning games that have been beneficial. As well as critically reflecting on each idea to discuss its performance through text or feedback. By sharing with the wider teaching community, each teacher’s thoughts and passions are expressed furthermore connecting them to each other through common interests and values through the factor of learning (Silvia Tolisano, 2014). Overall, teacher’s still need the help, advice and guidance offered through these reflective practices to make students their very own priority when it comes to education.

After reading this post you can all ask yourselves the question, why do I need to become a reflective practitioner? It is here where you begin to understand and appreciate the need to reflect on personal experiences, interests and values through critically evaluating all questions and information produced. A great piece of advice is to start your very own blog either on a personal or professional level where social discussions and interactions with like minded individuals become an act of connecting with people within your community. By expressing yourself through images and text it creates the cycle of reflection highlighted through your own work combined with theirs.

Screenshot of the Feedback: 

screen-shot-2016-10-06-at-9-52-04-pm

Copy of the Original Critical Reflection: 

Why do I need to become a reflective practitioner?

During each day every individual will reflect on past, present or future issues they have or will be presented with. Reflection isn’t just thinking about something in particular it is a process of identifying issues, questioning opinions, synthesising information and applying learning (Australian Catholic University, 2016).

To become a reflective practitioner, the process of self awareness, critical analysis, synthesis and evaluation allow each individual to be honest with oneself, question underlying values and beliefs and explore strengths and weaknesses (ACU, 2016). Reflection is used in all areas whether it be in everyday life, in your academic career or your future profession.

An example of an active reflective practitioner is the production of a personal blog whether it be educational, home and lifestyles or art and entertainment. Creating a blog for the public allows for connected learning as part of a community, sharing strengths and weakness, interests and hobbies and personal reflection. With the acceptance of public commentary and posts, individuals are able to learn from others, gain more information from a wide range of materials and connect with like minded people throughout the blogging community.

For University, all students in my course were required to create a blog on Digital and Communication Technology. It is here where we as a cohort are able to document our research, findings and opinions, critically reflect on each idea, text or feedback, share with the wider community our thoughts and passions furthermore connecting us to each other through common interests and values through the factor of learning (Silvia Tolisano, 2014).

After reading this post you can all ask yourselves the question, why do I need to become a reflective practitioner? It is here where you begin to understand and appreciate the need to reflect on personal experiences, interests and values through critically evaluating all questions and information produced. A great piece of advice is to start your very own blog where social discussions and interactions with like minded individuals become an act of connecting with people within your community. By expressing yourself through images and text it creates the cycle of reflection highlighted through your own work combined with theirs.

References: 

Australian Catholic University (2016), COMM140: Reflective Thinking. Retrieved from https://leo.acu.edu.au/pluginfile.php/1771134/mod_book/chapter/57216/COMM104_ReflectiveThinking.pdf

Silvia Tolisano, (2014). Blogging for Learning: Mulling it Over. Retrieved from http://langwitches.org/blog/2014/11/23/blogging-for-learning-mulling-it-over/

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