Rewrite of Critical Reflection 1

Rewritten Critical Reflection: 

Why do I need to become a reflective practitioner? 

During each day every individual will reflect on past, present or future issues they have or will be presented with in both personal and professional situations. Reflection isn’t just thinking about something in particular it is a process of identifying issues, questioning opinions, synthesising information and applying learning (Australian Catholic University, 2016).

To become a reflective practitioner, the process of self awareness, critical analysis, synthesis and evaluation allow each individual to be honest with oneself, question underlying values and beliefs and explore strengths and weaknesses (ACU, 2016). Reflection is used in all areas whether it be in everyday life, in your academic career or your future profession.

An example of an active reflective practitioner is the production of a personal blog whether it be educational, home and lifestyles or art and entertainment. Creating a blog for the public allows for connected learning as part of a community, sharing strengths and weakness, interests and hobbies and personal reflection. With the acceptance of public commentary and posts, individuals are able to learn from others, gain more information from a wide range of materials and connect with like minded people throughout the blogging community.

Reflective practices are also required in the business world, an example being education where teachers are able to continually improve and work on teaching methods and activities used in the classroom. It is here where teachers in similar fields are able to document their research, findings and opinions on specific activities performed by students such as worksheets or learning games that have been beneficial. As well as critically reflecting on each idea to discuss its performance through text or feedback. By sharing with the wider teaching community, each teacher’s thoughts and passions are expressed furthermore connecting them to each other through common interests and values through the factor of learning (Silvia Tolisano, 2014). Overall, teacher’s still need the help, advice and guidance offered through these reflective practices to make students their very own priority when it comes to education.

After reading this post you can all ask yourselves the question, why do I need to become a reflective practitioner? It is here where you begin to understand and appreciate the need to reflect on personal experiences, interests and values through critically evaluating all questions and information produced. A great piece of advice is to start your very own blog either on a personal or professional level where social discussions and interactions with like minded individuals become an act of connecting with people within your community. By expressing yourself through images and text it creates the cycle of reflection highlighted through your own work combined with theirs.

Screenshot of the Feedback: 

screen-shot-2016-10-06-at-9-52-04-pm

Copy of the Original Critical Reflection: 

Why do I need to become a reflective practitioner?

During each day every individual will reflect on past, present or future issues they have or will be presented with. Reflection isn’t just thinking about something in particular it is a process of identifying issues, questioning opinions, synthesising information and applying learning (Australian Catholic University, 2016).

To become a reflective practitioner, the process of self awareness, critical analysis, synthesis and evaluation allow each individual to be honest with oneself, question underlying values and beliefs and explore strengths and weaknesses (ACU, 2016). Reflection is used in all areas whether it be in everyday life, in your academic career or your future profession.

An example of an active reflective practitioner is the production of a personal blog whether it be educational, home and lifestyles or art and entertainment. Creating a blog for the public allows for connected learning as part of a community, sharing strengths and weakness, interests and hobbies and personal reflection. With the acceptance of public commentary and posts, individuals are able to learn from others, gain more information from a wide range of materials and connect with like minded people throughout the blogging community.

For University, all students in my course were required to create a blog on Digital and Communication Technology. It is here where we as a cohort are able to document our research, findings and opinions, critically reflect on each idea, text or feedback, share with the wider community our thoughts and passions furthermore connecting us to each other through common interests and values through the factor of learning (Silvia Tolisano, 2014).

After reading this post you can all ask yourselves the question, why do I need to become a reflective practitioner? It is here where you begin to understand and appreciate the need to reflect on personal experiences, interests and values through critically evaluating all questions and information produced. A great piece of advice is to start your very own blog where social discussions and interactions with like minded individuals become an act of connecting with people within your community. By expressing yourself through images and text it creates the cycle of reflection highlighted through your own work combined with theirs.

References: 

Australian Catholic University (2016), COMM140: Reflective Thinking. Retrieved from https://leo.acu.edu.au/pluginfile.php/1771134/mod_book/chapter/57216/COMM104_ReflectiveThinking.pdf

Silvia Tolisano, (2014). Blogging for Learning: Mulling it Over. Retrieved from http://langwitches.org/blog/2014/11/23/blogging-for-learning-mulling-it-over/

Feedback on Blogs

Feedback #1 on Emily’s Blog 

screen-shot-2016-10-06-at-8-35-57-pm

Feedback #2 on Kayla’s Blog 

screen-shot-2016-10-06-at-8-41-00-pm

It was actually really informative and interesting to search other people’s blogs with similar ideas and values to my own, I recommend you guys do the same!

Critical Reflection 3

An understanding of how changes in technology impact on the way humans communicate, and the ethical issues that surround these changes.

Technology nowadays has just become part of our everyday lives affecting the way we listen to music, communicate with one another, read books and research. Not only have individuals become reliant on such digital communication devices but they have also started to rule our lives. If you go into a class of university students for example and ask who here owns a mobile device mostly all except the rare few will raise their hands, does this not highlight the issues we now face when it comes to the changing ways in how humans communicate?

Technology has always been and continues to be the greatest change agent of our civilisation (Nejjai, 2012), with a huge example being Social Networking. Nejjai (2012) stated that in 2012 Facebook had over 1 billion users monthly and if this site were a country it would be the third largest after China, which screams millions!

In this day and age privacy has become a huge ethical issue affecting all users of the internet relating to cyberbullying and the information that is used to cause such behaviour, the presentation of personal private information given out too easily such as YouTube blogs and dating websites and the ultimate abuse of privacy relating to sexting either being the sender or receiver (Herman, 2011). The constant changing and evolution of such technologies have allowed these issues to occur and have been both beneficial and detrimental in both individual and business lives. This highlights more clearly the ethical issues that surround these changes and what may need to be done in order to control them.

Ask yourself this, how often would I spend on my phone a day? and then think during these hours are you in the presence of friends and family. This is a classic example of the disturbance of face to face communication. I, personally am a ‘supporter’ of this claim and would spend at least 4 hours a day on my mobile phone which these days is considered a commonality. Other affects of communication due to changes in technology include emailing instead of handwritten letters, video calls on Skype and FaceTime and the use of blogs to share journeys and information individually or on a business level. To think how far technology has come to allow us to do so much is incredible however some may say that these drastic changes have resulted in the detrimental impact on the way humans communicate with one another, abuse of private information and the continuance of ethical issues.

 

References:

Nejjai, Malek. (2012) The Changing Face of Tech in Business Retrieved from http://www.amadeus.com/blog/06/11/the-changing-face-of-technology-in-business-how-technology-has-affected-the-way-we-communicate-and-do-business/

Tavani, H. (2011) Ethics and Technology. John Wiley & Sons. Retrieved from https://books.google.com.au/books?hl=en&lr=&id=xGf8Z2CDQEgC&oi=fnd&pg=PA13&dq=ethics+and+technology&ots=egqZqxvia_&sig=6Lhc_MNVcbJyp4bV2yGiY_m7zFo#v=onepage&q=ethics%20and%20technology&f=false

 

 

 

Critical Reflection 2

Do I need a Digital Footprint? 

Requiring a digital footprint starts with the understanding of ethics which are moral principles that govern a person’s behaviour. The basis for ethical thinking include following articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) such as right to freedom of opinion and expression and privacy (Rafael Capurro, 2015). Individual users of digital technology should have the right and responsibility to have safe online experience while expressing their own opinions and values through whatever they do. While digital citizens have the right to express what they want they also need to have some understanding of online laws and policies since we represent both the countries we physically inhabit and the online world.

It is all good and well to be good digital citizens however one must carefully manage their digital footprint. Throughout the week 6 lecture, students had to complete a ‘Digital Footprint Self Reflection’ answering questions about our online activities and behaviour on such sites including online shopping, social media and mobile phones. “Do I use language or statements on some of these sites that I wouldn’t use face-to-face?” is a question asking students to reflect on what they put online, what they say on social media and what they record over message. For me, it allowed myself to become aware of my own digital footprint, how much time I spend on social media, what information I put online that my future boss for example might see and making sure my behaviour on all sites is kept the same representing my true self and identity. Are you aware of your own digital footprint?

A real life example is WikiLeaks and the digital footprint left behind. Multiple ethics had to be taken into consideration by journalism such as the public interest knowing the truth instead of lies, failure of contextual accuracy and the reliability of the material obtained and related too (Denis Muller, 2014). Through the motives of the leaker governments were ethically challenged trying to fix the views of their already stamped digital footprint in the public’s eyes.

Overall it is highly important to have a safe and reliable footprint for past, present and future use. “Your digital footprint paints a picture of who you are” allowing for a greater sense of digital citizenship when it comes to the online world (Internet Society, 2016).

Word Count: 364

 

References 

Denis Muller (2014). WikiLeaks, journalism ethics and the digital age: what did we learn? Retrieved from http://theconversation.com/wikileaks-journalism-ethics-and-the-digital-age-what-did-we-learn-28262

Internet Society (2016). Your Digital Footprint Matters. Retrieved from http://www.internetsociety.org/your-digital-footprint-matters

Rafael Capurro, (2015) Ethics and Information in the Digital Age. Retrieved from http://www.capurro.de/lida.htm

 

Critical Reflection 1

Why do I need to become a Reflective Practitioner?

During each day every individual will reflect on past, present or future issues they have or will be presented with. Reflection isn’t just thinking about something in particular it is a process of identifying issues, questioning opinions, synthesising information and applying learning (Australian Catholic University, 2016).

To become a reflective practitioner, the process of self awareness, critical analysis, synthesis and evaluation allow each individual to be honest with oneself, question underlying values and beliefs and explore strengths and weaknesses (ACU, 2016). Reflection is used in all areas whether it be in everyday life, in your academic career or your future profession.

An example of an active reflective practitioner is the production of a personal blog whether it be educational, home and lifestyles or art and entertainment. Creating a blog for the public allows for connected learning as part of a community, sharing strengths and weakness, interests and hobbies and personal reflection. With the acceptance of public commentary and posts, individuals are able to learn from others, gain more information from a wide range of materials and connect with like minded people throughout the blogging community.

For University, all students in my course were required to create a blog on Digital and Communication Technology. It is here where we as a cohort are able to document our research, findings and opinions, critically reflect on each idea, text or feedback, share with the wider community our thoughts and passions furthermore connecting us to each other through common interests and values through the factor of learning (Silvia Tolisano, 2014).

After reading this post you can all ask yourselves the question, why do I need to become a reflective practitioner? It is here where you begin to understand and appreciate the need to reflect on personal experiences, interests and values through critically evaluating all questions and information produced. A great piece of advice is to start your very own blog where social discussions and interactions with like minded individuals become an act of connecting with people within your community. By expressing yourself through images and text it creates the cycle of reflection highlighted through your own work combined with theirs.

 

Word Count: 354 

References: 

Australian Catholic University (2016), COMM140: Reflective Thinking. Retrieved from https://leo.acu.edu.au/pluginfile.php/1771134/mod_book/chapter/57216/COMM104_ReflectiveThinking.pdf

Silvia Tolisano, (2014). Blogging for Learning: Mulling it Over. Retrieved from http://langwitches.org/blog/2014/11/23/blogging-for-learning-mulling-it-over/